Comment Policy

All comments to posts have to await approval. Approval does not happen immediately. NOTE: Comments reflect the opinions of the person writing them and should not be assumed to reflect the opinion of the blog.

Management has two priorities: 1) Making sure money is made, hence upgrading and filling up apartments is their goal. "Amenities" are important in selling the place, though few residents use them. 2) If someone needs medical attention, Public Safety will be there, if alerted.

Quality of life issues are not that important, however. Things like the carpet rule or outsider dogs. These "rules" tend to be ignored, on purpose it seems. So you will see a lot that isn't taken care of properly, and complaints will be met with a creative excuse and a smile.

"Peace and quiet" must be a cruel joke, though this property is sold that way. There can be no peace and quiet as ALL apartments must be upgraded, which includes the installation of an AC unit below the window. Aside from the continual construction about the neighborhood, there is a new and noisy subway extension being built along East 14 st and the shut down of the L line. "Choosing" to live in NYC, now the newest mantra, is a fabrication when the talk is of ST and PCV, which was traditionally quiet, with no construction noise.

Though money was always important, it is now more important than ever. Money rules many things, as you will find.

At this point, 30 years into living here and seeing many things, I can state that Management and their reps are BS-ing us. I can't say that loudly enough: We are being BS-ed. I don't see any genuine change, though the "selling" of this place continues.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Memories....

From a few months back:

http://www.garodnick.com/press-release/message-council-member-garodnick-final-roberts-settlement

Message from Council Member Garodnick on Final Roberts Settlement!


I wanted to share the news that Justice Lowe today signed the final settlement in the Roberts v. Tishman Speyer case.  This is a historic moment for the Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village community, and for all rent stabilized residents who were unfairly overcharged by landlords receiving J-51 tax abatements across the City.

This case has always been about protecting the integrity of the rent stabilization system. The victory in Roberts sends a clear message that the rent stabilization law cannot and will not be circumvented.  It is fitting that the case originated in Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village, a community ravaged by the excesses of the housing boom that fought back.  The impact of this case has been felt far and wide—from the 21,250 members of the class, of which I am one, to residents in all J-51 buildings citywide.  It was through the persistence and courage of our neighbors that many tenants around the City have been able to clarify their rights under the law, and for that, I am extremely proud.

The settlement delivers $68.75 million in direct payments to tenants who were overcharged for rent between January 22, 2003 and December 31, 2011 and $105 million in rent savings during the time since the Roberts case was won, when rents were rolled back as part of an "interim agreement."   It also re-establishes all of the units in Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village as rent stabilized, and sets their legal rents. (For more detail on the settlement, read my plain language guide to the settlement here.)

It is our hope that the final settlement, to which there were no objectors, will present a new opportunity for CW Capital to now embrace the plan put forth by the Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village Tenants Association to ensure the long term affordability and stability in our neighborhood.

I want to thank the attorneys at Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz and Bernstein Liebhard who worked on this case for their persistence, advocacy and hard work, and the tenants who lent their names to this class action lawsuit for their courage.

I encourage all class members to file their claims by the May 15 deadline.   For more information on the claims process, please visit Berdon Claims' website at www.berdonclaims.com or call 800-766-3330.

Best, 
Dan Garodnick 

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

"I want to thank the attorneys at Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz and Bernstein Liebhard who worked on this case for their persistence, advocacy and hard work, and the tenants who lent their names to this class action lawsuit for their courage."


Winners:

Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz

Bernstein Liebhard

CW Capital



Losers:

Former market rate tenants

The PCVST community at-large


Photo Op--Special Mention:

Dan Gorodnick, et. al.

Anonymous said...

That's exactly what I have been saying on this blog and others for some time now. VOTE DAN OUT!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Ha!

Anonymous said...

Nice catch STR. An Etch A Sketch moment? Flip flop, flip flop.

Anonymous said...

It is "remarkable" that all the powers that be were touting the "great" Roberts settlement earlier this year and now they are blaming CW for acting in accordance with the settlement agreement. The real problem here was that the tenants' law firm cut a terrible deal for the tenants, took millions in fees and left the Roberts tenants with the mess. Of course CW's behavior in raising rents in the middle of a lease is reprehensible but I will bet that CW's action doesn't violate the terms of the settlement agreement. Roberts tenants should think about suing their former lawyers for malpractice.

Anonymous said...

Not sure I understand how the tenants lawyers could have gotten people out of their own leases in which they themselves agreed that the owner could raise the rents mid-lease. What does this have to do with the settlement exactly or the lawyers?

Anonymous said...

The lawyers should have understood the ramifications of the settlement, i.e. that it would allow CW to exercise its option to raise rents mid-lease , in some cases dramatically and should have addressed the issue before settling. Also in the documents explaining the settlement did the lawyers explain to the plaintiff tenants that in settling this option would kick in which in many cases would increase their rents in excess of any cash payments received?

Stuy Town Reporter said...

The lawyers for the tenants did a very poor job. But, hey, they made their money--and lots of it!

Stuy Town Reporter said...

And, again, the elephant in the room is the idea of tenant ownership of this place, but not in a good way. Garodnick and others wanted the Roberts case settled as quickly as possible, so that CWCapital would be then free to offer PCVST to the tenants and Brookfield. This was the leverage that the lawyers for CWCapital had. Want the case settled quicker, so you can buy the place? Then agree to these terms in the settlement.

Anonymous said...

And, again, the elephant in the room is the idea of tenant ownership of this place, but not in a good way. Garodnick and others wanted the Roberts case settled as quickly as possible, so that CWCapital would be then free to offer PCVST to the tenants and Brookfield. This was the leverage that the lawyers for CWCapital had. Want the case settled quicker, so you can buy the place? Then agree to these terms in the settlement

You hit the nail on the head.

Anonymous said...

Garodnick and the Roberts lawyers should be ashamed of themselves. They aided and abetted CW in screwing the tenants royally. I will never vote for Garodnick even if he's running for dog catcher.

Anonymous said...

Dan's plain language explanation of the Roberts settlement is worthy of a read top to bottom.

http://www.garodnick.com/press-release/roberts-settlement-plain-language